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Lay Sheets

At Cladco, we want to ensure that once you’ve purchased our roofing sheets that you know exactly how to lay roof sheets, tile sheets and more in the preferred way. Laying metal sheets in runs is normally the best way to achieve this and we recommend by starting at the eaves and in the corner away from the direction of the prevailing wind (If it’s a single sheet run). This will help prevent side laps facing into the wind and water ingress.

We recommend when laying your first few sheets to not fully fix them until you are sure they are correctly aligned. This can help mitigate the impact of any false starts to begin with and only once you are sure, is it best to put the remaining fixings in and carry on with the build.

For a double sheet run, we recommend following the images below.

Laying Box Profile Roof Sheets

For a single pitch roof the minimum pitch we recommend is 4-5º. Lay Box Profile sheets in runs. Start at the eaves and in the corner away from the direction of the prevailing wind (this will help to prevent side laps facing into the wind and water ingress). If the first sheet is not laid perpendicular to the eaves and ridge, adjustments will have to be regularly made when laying other sheets and a ‘saw tooth’ effect at the eaves will be seen. This may be unavoidable if the building is not square.

The first row of sheets should extend over the bottom purlin and the eaves so that rainwater can drain into a gutter or beyond the wall.

Sheets should be overlapped by the next sheet in the run by at least one profile or corrugation (‘side laps’).

Please note – maximum length of sheet we can supply is up to 9m. If you require a longer length, you will need to do a 2-sheet run as per image above.

You should always overlap the sheets by at least one corrugation. When overlapping sheets its recommended to use mastic lapping tape.

For side laps. It is good practice to use mastic lapping tape and stitching screws to ensure a robust weather resistant joint on side laps. Lapping tape with a section of 9mm x 1.5mm mastic should be run along the crest of the profile that is to be lapped, sheet to sheet stitching screws should then be used at 600mm intervals down the lap to consolidate the bond created by the lapping tape.

For end laps a minimum sheet over sheet overlap of 250mm should be allowed for where sheets lap, this lap must be supported underneath by a purlin. As with side laps, it is good practice to use lapping tape to help create a robust weather resistant joint. A strip of tape should be placed across the full width of the lap approximately 25mm from the end of the top end of the overlapped or bottom sheet. Lapping tape is considered more effectively than silicone.

How to Lay Tile Form Roof Sheets

For a single pitch roof the minimum pitch we recommend is 12 degrees Tile Form sheets must always be laid from right to left. When laying the first sheet it should be offered onto the roof to get the purlins in the correct place as when fixing the sheets, the screw will be in line with the purlins. Screws and purlins will match, fixings go just under the tile drop (curved aspect of sheet pattern)

Please note – maximum length of sheet we can supply is 5m. If you require a longer length, you will need to do a 2-sheet run.

If a two-sheet run is required, lay the sheets in this position and use the same fixing instructions as above.

Tile sheets have to be laid from right to left sequence, starting on the right-hand side of the roof laying on the next sheet to the left, lapping over the profile with the small gully detail on the last lap of the left of the sheet.

You should always overlap the sheets by at least one corrugation.

Tap each new sheet tight into place where it laps before the fixings and mastic tape are used. We suggest using a soft wood block and a mallet with some rag between the block and the sheet to prevent damage the sheet coating.

How to Lay Corrugated Roof Sheets

For a single pitch roof the minimum pitch we recommend is 10 degrees. For a single run of sheets start at the eaves and in the corner away from the direction of the prevailing wind (this will help to prevent side laps facing into the wind and water ingress). If the first sheet is not laid perpendicular to the eaves and ridge, adjustments will have to be regularly made when laying other sheets and a ‘saw tooth’ effect at the eaves will be seen. This may be unavoidable if the building is not square.

The first row of sheets should extend over the bottom purlin and the eaves so that rainwater can drain into a gutter or beyond the wall.

Sheets should be overlapped by the next sheet in the run by at least one profile or corrugation (‘side laps’).

Please note – maximum length of sheet we can supply is up to 5m in 0.5mm thickness and 6m in 0.7mm thickness. If you require a longer length, you will need to do a 2-sheet run as above.

You should always overlap the sheets by at least one corrugation. When overlapping sheets its recommended to use mastic lapping tape.

For side laps. It is good practice to use mastic lapping tape and stitching screws to ensure a robust weather resistant joint on side laps. Lapping tape with a section of 9mm x 1.5mm mastic should be run along the crest of the profile that is to be lapped, sheet to sheet stitching screws should then be used at 600mm intervals down the lap to consolidate the bond created by the lapping tape.

For end laps a minimum sheet over sheet overlap of 250mm should be allowed for where sheets lap, this lap must be supported underneath by a purlin. As with side laps, it is good practice to use lapping tape to help create a robust weather resistant joint. A strip of tape should be placed across the full width of the lap approximately 25mm from the end of the top end of the overlapped or bottom sheet. Lapping tape is considered more effectively than silicone.

Tap each new sheet tight into place where it laps before the fixings are used. We suggest using a soft wood block and a mallet with some rag between the block and the sheet to prevent damage the sheet coating.